Most liked and shared Brexit stories on Facebook (nat'l), 2020-11-27–2020-11-30

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'It's impossible': how Brexit has left British families unable to return to the UK

theguardian.com

Sun 29 Nov 2020 14.00 GMT Last modified on Mon 30 Nov 2020 09.58 GMT W hen Britain’s new immigration bill became law earlier this month, the home secretary, Priti Patel, tweeted her “delight, after many years of campaigning,” that free movement between the EU and Britain would at last end on 31 December. But the bill does not just repeal EU citizens’ right to work and live in UK – a key Brexit ask – or British nationals’ right to do the same across the bloc. It will also make it very hard indeed for many Britons who have already moved to ever come home again. Read more As Brexit negotiations on a trade and security deal enter what foreign secretary Dominic Raab said could be their final week...

'It's impossible': how Brexit has left British families unable to return to the UK | Europe | The Guardian

theguardian.com

Up to 40% of Britons in dual-national relationships fear they do not fulfil the income requirement to return. W hen Britain’s new immigration bill became law earlier this month, the home secretary, Priti Patel, tweeted her “delight, after many years of campaigning,” that free movement between the EU and Britain would at last end on 31 December. But the bill does not just repeal EU citizens’ right to work and live in UK – a key Brexit ask – or British nationals’ right to do the same across the bloc. It will also make it very hard indeed for many Britons who have already moved to ever come home again. Brexit: what will change for Britons in the EU on 1 January? Read more As Brexit negotiations...

Politicians were once held to account – now nothing stands in their way | Boris Johnson

theguardian.com

Organisations designed to investigate on our behalf are threatened, lied to or abolished. M ost people in Britain were brought up in a country that offered the faint hope of justice. The police would investigate corruption, if only occasionally. Politicians would dodge and weave but avoid flat-out lies. Political parties had moral standards, however flexible, and if a minister disgraced himself or herself they could resign. Opposition politicians, journalists, satirists, charities and alliances of concerned citizens worked on the assumption that if they exposed wrongdoing there was a chance it would stop. I don’t wish to romanticise the past. My small point is that we have not always been as...