Most liked and shared Brexit stories on Facebook (nat'l), 2020-11-16–2020-11-19

Powered by Webhose.io API.

The British government's first disaster of 2021? A food shortage | Brexit

theguardian.com

The UK relies on fresh produce from mainland Europe. But port logjams loom, and we appear to have run out of storage space, says Guardian columnist George Monbiot. A few days ago, I carried out a small experiment. I sent almost identical requests to two government departments. Is Britain really about to embrace chaos and misery for the sake of Brexit dogma? | Will Hutton Read more I asked the business department whether the UK holds strategic oil reserves. Yes: the UK keeps stocks equivalent to 90 days of net imports. I asked the environment department whether the UK holds strategic food reserves. No: they aren’t necessary, because “the UK has a highly resilient food supply chain”. The gover...

It was always lost on Brexiteers – but the EU is fundamentally about peace | Brexit | The Guardian

theguardian.com

The 75th anniversary of the Nuremberg trials puts the fantasy of resistance to tyrannical Brussels into proper perspective Nazi leaders in the dock at the Nuremberg trials, Germany, that ran from November 1945 to October 1946. Photograph: adoc-photos Nazi leaders in the dock at the Nuremberg trials, Germany, that ran from November 1945 to October 1946. Photograph: adoc-photos Wed 18 Nov 2020 07.00 GMT “I would rather not shake hands with a German of my age,” says Colette Marin-Catherine. “But I give all possible credit to the generations that came after.” There is steel in the elderly voice, but no anger. When Colette was 16, her older brother, Jean-Pierre, was deported to a German concentra...

It was always lost on Brexiteers – but the EU is fundamentally about peace | Brexit

theguardian.com

The 75th anniversary of the Nuremberg trials puts the fantasy of resistance to tyrannical Brussels into proper perspective, says Guardian columnist Rafael Behr. “I would rather not shake hands with a German of my age,” says Colette Marin-Catherine. “But I give all possible credit to the generations that came after.” There is steel in the elderly voice, but no anger. When Colette was 16, her older brother, Jean-Pierre, was deported to a German concentration camp. He was put to work as a slave labourer in underground tunnels assembling V2 rocket-propelled bombs. He died weeks before the camp was liberated by US soldiers. Brother and sister had both been active in the French resistance, but Col...