Most liked and shared Brexit stories on Facebook (nat'l), 2020-02-12–2020-02-14

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These three post-Brexit bills bulldoze a hole through environmental protections | Fiona Harvey | Opinion

theguardian.com

Wildlife, air quality and fish stocks are all at risk, says Guardian journalist Fiona Harvey. H edgehogs, yellowhammers and dormice did not figure highly in the EU referendum campaign, but they may turn out to be some of the first losers from Brexit. Rules on farmers cutting hedgerows and field margins that have protected the habitats of a variety of at-risk species are being lost amid the biggest shake-up of nature regulations in four decades. For three years, ministers have been proclaiming that leaving the EU would allow Britain to strengthen its environmental protections, and that all the benefits of membership would be faithfully carried over. Now we can see the worth of those promises,...

Home Office asks 101-year-old Italian man to get his parents to confirm his identity

mirror.co.uk

Giovanni Palmiero was trying to apply for settled status so he can stay in the UK after it leaves the EU but the computer misinterpreted his birth year as 2019 instead of 1919 A 101-year-old Italian man was asked to get his parents to confirm his identity by the Home Office after he applied to stay in the country post-Brexit. \nGiovanni Palmiero - who has been in London since 1966 - made his application for the EU settlement scheme at an advice centre in Islington, north London. \nAccording to the Guardian when a volunteer who helped Palmiero scanned his passport into the EU settled status app to share the biometric data with the Home Office, the system misinterpreted his birth year as 2019 ...

Sonia Boyce first black woman to represent Great Britain at Venice Biennale | Art and design | The Guardian

theguardian.com

Artist caused storm in 2018 when she removed painting of nymphs from Manchester Art Gallery. The artist Sonia Boyce has been chosen to represent Britain at the Venice Biennale – the first black woman to do so. Her work will fill the UK pavilion from May until November next year. Boyce, who lives and works in London, caused controversy two years ago when she removed John William Waterhouse’s 1896 painting Hylas and the Nymphs from the wall of the Manchester Art Gallery for a week. She wrote in the Guardian that the action was intended to draw attention to the way decisions are made in museums about what is made visible to the public. Nonetheless, it sparked a furious backlash, with many accus...